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TMCNet:  CORNING INC /NY - 10-K - Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

[February 13, 2013]

CORNING INC /NY - 10-K - Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

(Edgar Glimpses Via Acquire Media NewsEdge) Organization of Information Management's Discussion and Analysis provides a historical and prospective narrative on the Company's financial condition and results of operations. This discussion includes the following sections: • Overview • Results of Operations • Reportable Segments • Liquidity and Capital Resources • Environment • Critical Accounting Estimates • New Accounting Standards • Forward-Looking Statements CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 17 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents Overview Although Corning's net income decreased in 2012 when compared to 2011, we ended the year having made good progress towards our goals despite some challenging economic conditions and changing market environments. In 2012, we set a record for annual sales performance, stabilized our Display Technologies segment primarily through moderating price declines, and continued to grow our new product portfolio.



While Corning remains well positioned for the future, the economic headwinds which started in 2011 and continued into 2012 impacted the majority of our segments. Most severely impacted was our Display Technologies segment, due to significant year-over-year price declines which impacted both our wholly-owned business and our Display Technologies equity affiliates. These price declines were driven by excess glass supply and share shifts at several major customers beginning in the latter half of 2011 and continuing into the first quarter of 2012. The supply chain became more balanced during the remainder of 2012, as we saw a better matching of supply and demand for glass, resulting in more moderate sequential price declines. Results in our Telecommunications segment declined on higher sales in 2012, driven by an increase in operating expenses, the impact of restructuring actions and lower sales of premium fiber products, coupled with the absence of a contingent liability reversal recorded in the third quarter of 2011 in the amount of $27 million. Results also declined in the Environmental Technologies segment, due to a decrease in light duty diesel product sales and the impact of restructuring actions, offset slightly by improved manufacturing performance and lower air freight expenses. Although sales in the Life Sciences segment increased, largely as a result of the acquisition of the Discovery Labware business and a small acquisition completed in the fourth quarter of 2011, segment results declined due to an increase in acquisition-related operating expenses. Results increased substantially in our Specialty Materials segment, driven by significantly higher sales of our Corning Gorilla Glass used in portable display devices.

For the year ended December 31, 2012, we generated net income of $1.7 billion or $1.15 per share compared to net income of $2.8 billion or $1.77 per share for 2011. When compared to last year, the decrease in net income was due largely to the following items: • Lower net income in the Display Technologies segment due to significant price declines at both our wholly-owned business and the segment's equity affiliates; • The impact of restructuring charges totaling $60 million, after tax, for costs associated with workforce reductions, asset write-offs and exit costs related to Corning's corporate-wide restructuring plan announced in the fourth quarter of 2012; • A decline in equity earnings from Dow Corning due to a significant decrease in earnings at Hemlock Semiconductor Group (Hemlock), Dow Corning's consolidated subsidiary that manufactures high purity polycrystalline silicon for the semiconductor and solar industries, driven by price and volume declines, coupled with restructuring and impairment charges in the amount of $81 million, after tax, related to workforce reductions and asset write-offs; • The absence of a tax benefit in the amount of $41 million from amending our 2006 U.S. Federal tax return to claim foreign tax credits, recorded in the third quarter of 2011; • Lower royalty income from our equity affiliate Samsung Corning Precision Materials due to the combination of lower sales and the reduction in the royalty rate which took effect in December 2011; and • An increase in our effective tax rate due to the following: - Temporary expiration of favorable U.S. tax provisions, the effects of which will be reversed in the first quarter of 2013 due to the retroactive application of The American Taxpayer Relief act enacted on January 3, 2013; - The partial expiration of tax holidays in Taiwan; and - Change in our mix of earnings.

The decrease in net income in 2012 was offset somewhat by higher net income in our Specialty Materials segment, a $52 million translation gain as a result of the liquidation of a foreign subsidiary, and the favorable impact of movements in foreign exchange rates.

Corning remains committed to a strategy of growing through global innovation.

This strategy has served us well. Our key priorities for 2012 were similar to those in prior years: protect our financial health and invest in the future.

During 2012, we made the following progress on these priorities: Financial Health Our financial position remained sound and we delivered strong cash flows from operating activities. Significant items in 2012 included the following: • Our debt to capital ratio at December 31, 2012 was 14%, higher than our debt to capital ratio of 10% at December 31, 2011.

• Operating cash flow for the year was $3.2 billion, consistent with 2011.

• We ended the year with over $6.1 billion of cash and short-term investments.

• Corning's Board of Directors declared a 20% increase in the Company's quarterly common stock dividend.

• We completed a stock repurchase program which began in the fourth quarter of 2011. During 2012, we repurchased 56 million shares of common stock for $720 million. This action reflects our belief that our share price is below our intrinsic value and our confidence in our ability to continue to generate strong cash flows in the future.

Investing in our future We continue to focus on the future and on what we do best - creating keystone components that enable high-technology systems. We remain committed to investing in research, development and engineering to drive innovation. During 2012, we maintained a balanced innovation strategy focused on: growing our existing businesses; developing opportunities adjacent or closely related to our existing technical and manufacturing capabilities; and investing in long range opportunities in each of our market segments.

We continue to work on new products, including glass substrates for high performance displays and LCD applications, diesel filters and substrates, and the optical fiber, cable and hardware and equipment that enable fiber-to-the-premises, and next generation data centers. In addition, we are focusing on wireless solutions for diverse venue applications, such as distributed antenna systems, fiber to the cell site and fiber to the antenna. We have focused our research, development and engineering spending to support the advancement of new product attributes for our Corning Gorilla Glass suite of products. We will continue to focus on adjacent glass opportunities which leverage existing materials or manufacturing processes, including Corning® Willow™ Glass, our ultra-slim flexible glass substrate for use in next-generation consumer electronic technologies.

Our research, development and engineering expenditures increased by $74 million in 2012 when compared to 2011, but remained relatively constant as a percentage of net sales. We believe our spending levels are appropriate to support our technology and innovation strategies.

Capital spending decreased in 2012 compared to 2011. In 2010, Corning announced several multi-year investment plans to increase manufacturing capacity in several of our reportable segments. Specifically, the projects focused on an LCD glass substrate facility in China for our Display Technologies segment and a capacity expansion project for Specialty Materials' Corning Gorilla Glass in Japan. Although spending for these projects continued into 2012, the majority of the construction costs were incurred in 2011, resulting in a significant decrease in capital spending in those segments. Slightly offsetting the decline was an increase in capital spending in the Telecommunications segment, driven by capacity expansion in our fiber business. Total capital expenditures for 2012 were $1.8 billion. In 2012, approximately $900 million was invested in our Display Technologies segment.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 18 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents We expect our 2013 capital spending to be about $1.3 billion. Approximately $500 million will be allocated to our Display Technologies segment, of which approximately $200 million will be related to spending on 2012 capital projects.

Corporate Outlook While Corning will not be without challenges in 2013 due to the uncertainty of the global economy, we expect sales to grow in our Telecommunications, Life Sciences, Specialty Materials and Environmental Technologies segments, and for our market share to stabilize and price declines to be moderate in our Display Technologies segment. A rise in global demand for Corning's optical fiber and cable, combined with growth of enterprise network solutions products and fiber-to-the-premises sales in Australia should propel the sales improvement in our Telecommunications segment. Our recent acquisition of the majority of the Discovery Labware business of Becton, Dickinson and Company is expected to drive the Life Sciences segment sales growth in 2013. We believe the overall LCD glass retail market in 2013 will increase in the mid-to-high single digits from 3.5 billion square feet in 2012, driven by the combination of an increase in retail sales of LCD televisions and the demand for larger television screen sizes. Net income may be negatively impacted by lower equity earnings from our equity affiliate Dow Corning and the impact of movements in foreign exchange rates. We may take advantage of acquisition opportunities that support the long-term strategies of our businesses. We remain confident that our strategy to grow through global innovation, while preserving our financial stability, will enable our continued long-term success.

Results of Operations Selected highlights from our continuing operations follow (dollars in millions): % change 2012 2011 2010 12 vs. 11 11 vs. 10 Net sales $ 8,012 $ 7,890 $ 6,632 2 19 Gross margin $ 3,397 $ 3,566 $ 3,049 (5 ) 17 (gross margin %) 42 % 45 % 46 % Selling, general and administrative expense $ 1,165 $ 1,033 $ 1,015 13 2 (as a % of net sales) 15 % 13 % 15 % Research, development and engineering expenses $ 745 $ 671 $ 603 11 11 (as a % of net sales) 9 % 9 % 9 % Restructuring, impairment and other charges (credits) $ 133 $ 129 $ (329 ) 3 * (as a % of net sales) 2 % 2 % (5 )% Asbestos litigation charge (credit) $ 14 $ 24 $ (49 ) (42 ) * (as a % of net sales) 0 % 0 % (1 )% Equity in earnings of affiliated companies $ 810 $ 1,471 $ 1,958 (45 ) (25 ) (as a % of net sales) 10 % 19 % 30 % Income before income taxes $ 2,117 $ 3,213 $ 3,845 (34 ) (16 ) (as a % of net sales) 26 % 41 % 58 % (Provision) benefit for income taxes $ (389 ) $ (408 ) $ (287 ) (5 ) 42 (as a % of net sales) (5 )% (5 )% (4 )% Net income attributable to Corning Incorporated $ 1,728 $ 2,805 $ 3,558 (38 ) (21 ) (as a % of net sales) 22 % 36 % 54 % *The percentage change calculation is not meaningful.

Net Sales Net sales in 2012 increased slightly when compared to the prior year, due to sales growth in the Specialty Materials, Telecommunications and Life Sciences segments, offset almost entirely by a decrease in sales in our Display Technologies segment. Sales in the Specialty Materials segment increased by double-digits due to the strong demand for Corning Gorilla Glass that is used as cover glass in portable handheld display devices, tablets and notebook computers. Telecommunications segment sales increased primarily due to sales growth in wireless and fiber-to-the-premises products. The increase in sales in our Life Sciences segment was driven by the acquisition of the BD Discovery Labware business in the fourth quarter of 2012, and by the small acquisition we completed in the fourth quarter of 2011 which produces high-quality cell culture media. Additionally, net sales were positively impacted by movements in foreign exchange rates.

Net sales in 2011 increased 19% when compared to 2010, due to sales growth in all of our segments, with the largest increases occurring in the Specialty Materials, Telecommunications and Environmental segments. Sales in the Specialty Materials segment increased by 86%, due to the strong demand for Corning Gorilla Glass that is used as cover glass in portable handheld display devices, tablets and notebook computers. Telecommunications segment sales increased due to strength across all of their product lines, most significantly in optical fiber and cable and fiber-to-the-premises products. Sales in the Environmental Technologies segment were higher, driven by higher demand for our diesel products. Additionally, net sales were positively impacted by movements in foreign exchange rates.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 19 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents In 2012, net sales into international markets accounted for 77% of net sales.

For 2011 and 2010, net sales into international markets accounted for 78% and 74%, respectively, of net sales.

Cost of Sales The types of expenses included in the cost of sales line item are: raw materials consumption, including direct and indirect materials; salaries, wages and benefits; depreciation and amortization; production utilities; production-related purchasing; warehousing (including receiving and inspection); repairs and maintenance; inter-location inventory transfer costs; production and warehousing facility property insurance; rent for production facilities; and other production overhead.

Gross Margin For 2012, gross margin dollars and as a percentage of sales decreased when compared to 2011, due to the impact of significant price declines in our Display Technologies segment. Partially offsetting this decline was improvement in our Specialty Materials segment, where significantly higher sales, increased manufacturing efficiency, and the absence of large cover glass start-up and tank conversion costs incurred in 2011, led to a double-digit increase in gross margin.

For 2011, gross margin dollars increased when compared to 2010, but declined slightly as a percentage of sales. Improvements in gross margin were driven by the impact of strong sales in the Specialty Materials segment, along with volume increases and manufacturing efficiency gains in the Environmental Technologies segment. Offsetting these gains were the impacts of significant price declines in our Display Technologies segment and large cover glass start-up and tank conversion costs.

Selling, General, and Administrative Expenses Selling, general, and administrative expenses for 2012 increased when compared to 2011, due primarily to an increase in performance-based compensation costs, expenses associated with the acquisition of the BD Discovery Labware business, and the absence of a credit in the amount of $27 million resulting from a reduction in a contingent liability associated with an acquisition recorded in 2011. As a percentage of net sales, selling, general, and administrative expenses in 2012 increased when compared to 2011, due to the increase in spending described above and relatively consistent net sales year over year.

Selling, general, and administrative expenses for 2011 increased slightly when compared to 2010, due primarily to an increase in salaries, partially as a result of three small acquisitions completed in 2011 and in the latter half of 2010, offset by an adjustment to performance-based compensation costs and a credit of $27 million resulting from a reduction in a contingent liability associated with an acquisition recorded in the first quarter of 2011. As a percentage of net sales, selling, general, and administrative expenses in 2011 were down considerably when compared to 2010.

The types of expenses included in the selling, general and administrative expenses line item are: salaries, wages and benefits; travel; sales commissions; professional fees; and depreciation and amortization, utilities, and rent for administrative facilities.

Research, Development and Engineering Expenses Research, development and engineering expenses increased by 11% in 2012 when compared to 2011, but remained relatively constant as a percentage of net sales.

During 2012, Corning's research, development and engineering focused on new product development, as well as adjacent glass opportunities which leverage existing materials or manufacturing processes. We believe our spending levels are adequate to support our technology and innovation strategies.

Research, development and engineering expenses for 2011 increased by $68 million to $671 million in 2011 when compared to 2010, but remained relatively constant as a percentage of net sales. Corning's research, development and engineering expenses focused on our Specialty Materials and Telecommunications segments as we strive to capitalize on growth opportunities in those segments.

Restructuring, Impairment, and Other Charges and Credits Corning recorded restructuring, impairment, and other charges and credits in 2012, 2011 and 2010, which affect the comparability of our results for the periods presented. Additional information on restructuring and asset impairment is found in Note 2 (Restructuring, Impairment and Other Charges (Credits)), Note 9 (Property, Net of Accumulated Depreciation) and Note 16 (Fair Value Measurements) to the Consolidated Financial Statements. A description of those charges and credits follows: 2012 Activity In response to uncertain global economic conditions, and the potential for slower growth in many of our businesses in 2013, Corning implemented a corporate-wide restructuring plan in the fourth quarter of 2012. We recorded charges of $89 million, before tax, which included costs for workforce reductions, asset write-offs and exit costs. Total cash expenditures associated with these actions are expected to be approximately $49 million, with the majority of spending for employee-related costs completed in 2013. Annualized savings from these actions are estimated to be approximately $71 million and will be reflected largely in selling, general, and administrative expenses.

The Specialty Materials segment recorded an impairment charge in the fourth quarter of 2011 in the amount of $130 million related to certain assets used in the production of large cover glass due to sales that were significantly below our expectations. In the fourth quarter of 2012, after reassessing the large cover glass business, Corning concluded that the large cover glass market was developing differently in 2012 than our expectations, demand for larger-sized cover glass was declining, and the market for this type of glass was instead targeting smaller gen size products. Additionally, in the fourth quarter of 2012, our primary customer of large cover glass notified Corning of its decision to exit from this display market. Based on these events, we recorded an additional impairment charge in the fourth quarter of 2012 in the amount of $44 million, before tax. This impairment charge represents a write-down of assets specific to the glass-strengthening process for large size cover glass to their fair market values, and includes machinery and equipment used in the ion exchange process.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 20 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents 2011 Activity In the fourth quarter of 2011, the Specialty Materials segment recorded an impairment charge in the amount of $130 million related to certain assets located in Japan used in the ion exchange process for the production of large cover glass. Large cover glass is primarily used as a cover sheet of strengthened glass for frameless (bezel-less) LCD displays. The large cover glass impairment charge represents a write-down of assets specific to the glass-strengthening process for large size cover glass to their relative fair market values as of the date of impairment. This asset group includes machinery and equipment used in the ion exchange process and facilities dedicated to the ion exchange process.

2010 Activity In the fourth quarter of 2010, we recorded $324 million in other credits as settlement of business interruption and property damage insurance claims resulting from two events which impacted production at several of our LCD glass manufacturing facilities. In August 2009, an earthquake halted production at one of our LCD glass manufacturing facilities in Japan and in October 2009, production at our facility in Taichung, Taiwan was impacted by a power disruption.

Asbestos Litigation In 2012, we recorded an increase to our asbestos litigation liability of $14 million compared to an increase of $24 million in 2011. In 2010, we recorded a net decrease to our asbestos litigation liability of $49 million. The net decrease in 2010 was due primarily to a $54 million decrease to our estimated liability for asbestos litigation that was recorded in the first quarter of 2010, as a result of the change in terms of the proposed settlement of the PCC asbestos claims. For the remainder of 2010, we recorded net credit adjustments to our asbestos litigation liability of $5 million to reflect the change in value of the estimated settlement liability.

Our asbestos litigation liability was estimated to be $671 million at December 31, 2012, compared with an estimate of $657 million at December 31, 2011. The entire obligation is classified as a non-current liability as installment payments for the cash portion of the obligation are not planned to commence until more than 12 months after the proposed Amended PCC Plan is ultimately effective, and a portion of the obligation will be fulfilled through the direct contribution of Corning's investment in PCE (currently recorded as a non-current other equity method investment).

See Legal Proceedings for additional information about this matter.

Equity in Earnings of Affiliated Companies The following provides a summary of equity earnings of affiliated companies (in millions): Years ended December 31, 2012 2011 2010 Samsung Corning Precision Materials $ 699 $ 1,031 $ 1,473 Dow Corning 90 404 444 All other 21 36 41 TOTAL EQUITY EARNINGS $ 810 $ 1,471 $ 1,958 Equity earnings of affiliated companies decreased in 2012, reflecting lower earnings performance at both Samsung Corning Precision Materials and at Dow Corning, when compared to last year.

The change in equity earnings from Samsung Corning Precision Materials is explained more fully in the discussion of the performance of the Display Technologies segment and in All Other.

Equity earnings from Dow Corning decreased substantially in 2012 when compared to 2011. Beginning in the latter half of 2011, and continuing into 2012, Dow Corning began experiencing unfavorable industry conditions at its consolidated subsidiary Hemlock Semiconductor Group (Hemlock), a producer of high purity polycrystalline silicon for the semiconductor and solar industries, driven by over-capacity at all levels of the solar industry supply chain. This over-capacity led to significant declines in polycrystalline spot prices in the fourth quarter of 2011, and prices remained depressed throughout 2012. Also potentially impacting this business is a Chinese Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM) anti-dumping and countervailing duty investigation of imports of solar-grade polycrystalline solar products from the U.S. and Korea. If the Chinese authorities rule that dumping or subsidization took place, they may impose additional duties on future imports of solar-grade polycrystalline silicon to China from the U.S.

Due to the conditions and uncertainties described above, sales volume has declined and production levels of certain operating assets have been reduced. As a result, Dow Corning determined that a polycrystalline silicon plant expansion previously delayed since the fourth quarter of 2011 would no longer be economically viable and made the decision to abandon this expansion activity in the fourth quarter of 2012. The abandonment resulted in an impairment charge of $57 million, before tax, for Corning's share of the write down in the value of these construction-in-progress assets. Further, the startup of another plant expansion that was expected to begin production in 2013 is being delayed until sales volumes increase to levels necessary to support operations.

Additionally, during the fourth quarter of 2012, the events and circumstances described above indicated that additional assets of Dow Corning's polycrystalline silicon business might be impaired. In accordance with accounting guidance for impairment of long-lived assets, Dow Corning compared estimated undiscounted cash flows to the assets' carrying value and determined that the asset group is recoverable as of December 31, 2012. However, it is reasonably possible that the estimate of undiscounted cash flows could change in the near term, resulting in the need to write down those assets to fair value.

If a significant adverse duty is imposed by MOFCOM or there is continued pricing deterioration or other adverse market conditions that result in non-performance by customers under long-term contracts, Dow Corning's estimates of cash flows might change. Partially mitigating the adverse circumstances described above are long-term contracts that Dow Corning established in preparation for this negative volatility. These long-term contracts contain customer pre-payment requirements, as well as a provision that the customers "take or pay" the contracted volume of the polycrystalline silicon over the life of the contract.

Corning's share of the carrying value of this asset group is approximately $700 million, after tax.

In addition to the significant declines in polycrystalline silicon prices and the impairment charge described above, equity earnings from Dow Corning were also negatively impacted in 2012 by the following items: • Corning's share of the restructuring actions taken in the silicone products segment associated with workforce reductions and the impairment of assets in the amount of $30 million, before tax; • Higher operating expenses due to an increase in pension expense, severance expense and compensation accruals; • Price declines for silicone products; and • The unfavorable impact from movements in foreign exchange rates.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 21 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents The decrease in equity earnings from Dow Corning in 2012 was offset somewhat by the following items: • A gain in the amount of $10 million, before tax, associated with the resolution of a contract dispute by Hemlock against one of its customers relating to enforcement of long-term supply agreements; • An increase in volume for silicone products; and • Lower interest expense.

The decline in equity earnings from Dow Corning in 2011 when compared to 2010 was primarily due to the following items: • An increase in raw material costs of slightly above $100 million; • A sales shift from higher priced, higher margin silicones to lower priced, lower margin silicones; and • A decrease in advanced energy manufacturing tax credits.

The decrease in equity earnings from Dow Corning was partially offset by a gain in the amount of $89 million associated with the resolution of a contract dispute by Hemlock against one of its customers relating to enforcement of long-term supply agreements.

Other Income (Expense), Net "Other income (expense), net" in Corning's consolidated statements of income includes the following (in millions): Years ended December 31, 2012 2011 2010 Royalty income from Samsung Corning Precision Materials $ 83 $ 219 $ 265 Foreign currency transaction and hedge gains (losses), net 8 (43 ) (22 ) Loss on retirement of debt (26 ) (30 ) Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interests 5 3 2 Other, net 13 (61 ) (31 ) TOTAL $ 83 $ 118 $ 184 Royalty income from Samsung Corning Precision Materials decreased significantly in 2012, when compared to 2011, reflecting a decrease in the applicable royalty rate, coupled with a decline in sales volume at Samsung Corning Precision Materials. In December 2011, the applicable royalty rate was reduced for a five-year period by approximately 50% compared to the prior five years.

Income Before Income Taxes In addition to the items identified under Gross margin, Restructuring, impairment and other charges (credits), Asbestos litigation charge (credit), and Other income, net, movements in foreign exchange rates also had a slightly positive impact for the years presented.

Provision for Income Taxes Our provision for income taxes and the related effective income tax rates were as follows (in millions): Years ended December 31, 2012 2011 2010 Provision for income taxes $ 389 $ 408 $ 287 Effective tax rate 18.4 % 12.7 % 7.5 % The effective income tax rate for 2012 differed from the U.S. statutory rate of 35% primarily due to the following items: • Rate differences on income/(losses) of consolidated foreign companies, partially offset by U.S. tax on deemed repatriated earnings of which $37 million will be reversed in the first quarter of 2013 due to the retroactive application of the American Taxpayer Relief Act enacted on January 3, 2013; • The impact of equity in earnings of nonconsolidated affiliates reported in the financials net of tax; and • The benefit of tax incentives in foreign jurisdictions, primarily Taiwan.

The effective income tax rate for 2011 differed from the U.S. statutory rate of 35% primarily due to the following items: • Rate differences on income/(losses) of consolidated foreign companies; • The impact of equity in earnings of nonconsolidated affiliates reported in the financials net of tax; • The benefit of tax incentives in foreign jurisdictions, primarily Taiwan; and • A $41 million tax benefit from amending our 2006 U.S. Federal return to claim foreign tax credits.

The effective income tax rate for 2010 differed from the U.S. statutory rate of 35% primarily due to the following items: • Rate differences on income/(losses) of consolidated foreign companies; • The impact of equity in earnings of nonconsolidated affiliates reported in the financials net of tax; • The benefit of tax incentives in foreign jurisdictions, primarily Taiwan; • The benefit of excess foreign tax credits from repatriation of current year earnings of certain foreign subsidiaries; and • The impact of the reversal of the deferred tax assets associated with a tax exempt subsidy attributable to our other postretirement benefits liability.

Corning has valuation allowances on certain shorter-lived deferred tax assets such as those represented by capital loss carry forwards and state tax net operating loss carry forwards, as well as other foreign net operating loss carry forwards and federal and state tax credits, because we cannot conclude that it is more likely than not that we will earn income of the character required to utilize these assets before they expire. U.S. profits of approximately $7.1 billion will be required to fully realize the deferred tax assets as of December 31, 2012. Of that amount, $3.8 billion of U.S. profits will be required over the next 13 years to fully realize the deferred tax assets associated with federal net operating loss and credit carry forwards. The remaining deferred tax assets will be realized as the underlying temporary differences reverse over an extended period. The amount of U.S. and foreign deferred tax assets that had valuation allowances at December 31, 2012 and 2011 was $210 million and $219 million, respectively.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 22 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents We currently provide income taxes on the earnings of foreign subsidiaries and affiliated companies to the extent these earnings are currently taxable or not indefinitely reinvested. As of December 31, 2012, taxes have not been provided on approximately $11.9 billion of accumulated foreign unremitted earnings that are expected to remain invested indefinitely. It is not practical to calculate the unrecognized deferred tax liability on those earnings.

Our foreign subsidiary in Taiwan operates under various tax holiday arrangements. The nature and extent of such arrangements vary, and the benefits of such arrangements phase out through 2015. The impact of the tax holidays on our effective rate is a reduction in the rate of 1.6, 2.0 and 3.1 percentage points for 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

While we expect the amount of unrecognized tax benefits to change in the next 12 months, we do not expect the change to have a significant impact on the results of operations or our financial position.

Refer to Note 6 (Income Taxes) to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further details regarding income tax matters.

Net Income Attributable to Corning Incorporated As a result of the items discussed above, net income and per share data was as follows (in millions, except per share amounts): Years ended December 31, 2012 2011 2010 Net income attributable to Corning Incorporated $ 1,728 $ 2,805 $ 3,558 Basic earnings per common share $ 1.16 $ 1.80 $ 2.28 Diluted earnings per common share $ 1.15 $ 1.77 $ 2.25 Shares used in computing per share amounts Basic earnings per common share 1,494 1,562 1,558 Diluted earnings per common share 1,506 1,583 1,581 Reportable Segments Our reportable segments are as follows: • Display Technologies - manufactures glass substrates for flat panel liquid crystal displays.

• Telecommunications - manufactures optical fiber and cable and hardware and equipment components for the telecommunications industry.

• Environmental Technologies - manufactures ceramic substrates and filters for automotive and diesel applications. This reportable segment is an aggregation of our Automotive and Diesel operating segments as these two segments share similar economic characteristics, products, customer types, production processes and distribution methods.

• Specialty Materials - manufactures products that provide more than 150 material formulations for glass, glass ceramics and fluoride crystals to meet demand for unique customer needs.

• Life Sciences - manufactures glass and plastic labware, equipment, media and reagents to provide workflow solutions for scientific applications.

All other reportable segments that do not meet the quantitative threshold for separate reporting have been grouped as "All Other". This group is primarily comprised of development projects and results for new product lines.

We prepared the financial results for our segments on a basis that is consistent with the manner in which we internally disaggregate financial information to assist in making internal operating decisions. We included the earnings of equity affiliates that are closely associated with our reportable segments in the respective segment's net income. We have allocated certain common expenses among our reportable segments differently than we would for stand-alone financial information. Segment net income may not be consistent with measures used by other companies. The accounting policies of our reportable segments are the same as those applied in the consolidated financial statements.

Display Technologies % change (dollars in millions) 2012 2011 2010 12 vs. 11 11 vs. 10 Net sales $ 2,909 $ 3,145 $ 3,011 (8 ) 4 Equity earnings of affiliated companies $ 692 $ 1,027 $ 1,452 (33 ) (29 ) Net income $ 1,602 $ 2,349 $ 2,993 (32 ) (22 ) CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 23 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents 2012 vs. 2011 The decrease in net sales in 2012, when compared to 2011, reflects significant price declines which occurred in the fourth quarter of 2011 and the first quarter of 2012, driven by customer and competitive pressures associated with share shifts at several major customers in a period of excess glass supply.

Sequential price declines became much more moderate in the second and third quarters of 2012, reflecting a better matching of supply and demand for glass, and more stable levels of inventory in the LCD supply chain. In the third and fourth quarter of 2012, Corning entered into new agreements with key customers.

These agreements stabilize Corning's share at each of the customers and maintain a fixed relationship between Corning's pricing and competitive pricing at that customer. Fourth quarter sequential price declines were slightly higher than the prior two quarters, due to some initial adjustments to line up Corning's prior pricing with the requirements of these new agreements. Retail demand for larger-sized LCD televisions drove a double-digit increase in volume in our wholly-owned business in 2012, when compared to the prior year, and slightly offset the price declines described above. Movements in foreign exchange rates did not significantly impact net sales of this segment.

The decrease in equity earnings from our Display Technologies equity affiliates in 2012, when compared to 2011, reflected substantial price declines, driven by the circumstances described above, relatively consistent volume and share loss at a key customer. Also negatively impacting equity earnings were restructuring actions taken in the fourth quarter of 2012, consisting largely of tank and finishing line asset write-offs, in the amount of $18 million. Although equity earnings of the equity affiliates of this segment are impacted by movements in both the U.S. dollar - Japanese yen and U.S. dollar - Korean won exchange rates, movements in foreign exchange rates did not significantly impact equity earnings for the year ended December 31, 2012.

When compared to 2011, the decrease in net income in 2012 reflects the impact of price declines described above at both our wholly-owned business and the segment equity affiliates, a reduction in royalty income, and the impact of restructuring actions, partially offset by a double-digit increase in volume at our wholly-owned business. Restructuring costs in this segment totaled approximately $21 million, before tax, and consisted primarily of the write-off of finishing line assets located in Japan and exit costs for the consolidation of office space. Movements in foreign exchange rates did not significantly impact net income of this segment.

A number of Corning's patents and know-how are licensed to Samsung Corning Precision Materials, as well as to third parties, which generates royalty income. Royalty income from Samsung Corning Precision Materials decreased significantly in 2012, when compared to 2011, reflecting a decrease in the applicable royalty rate, coupled with a decline in sales volume at Samsung Corning Precision Materials. In December 2011, the applicable royalty rate was reduced for a five-year period by approximately 50% compared to the prior five years. Refer to Note 7 (Investments) to the Consolidated Financial Statements for more information about related party transactions.

2011 vs. 2010 The end market for LCD televisions was up slightly in 2011, with unit growth rates remaining consistent with or exceeding our expectations across all geographic regions. Additionally, larger-sized LCD televisions were the fastest growing size category in 2011 and have resulted in area growth rates that were even higher than unit growth rates. However, because Corning sells to panel makers and not to end market consumers, supply chain expansion and contraction for this industry are key factors in Corning's sales volume. While end market demand continues to grow in all LCD applications, inventory levels within the LCD supply chain have not kept pace with this growth, and have, in fact, declined in absolute terms during 2011 when compared to 2010, resulting in lower volume and excess capacity in the supply chain. As a result, Corning announced in the fourth quarter of 2011 that it would reduce capacity at our wholly-owned business by delaying the start-up of new glass melting tanks, as well as postponing the relight of tanks that were removed from service for normal repair. Our equity affiliate, Samsung Corning Precision Materials, took similar actions in the fourth quarter of 2011.

The slight increase in net sales in the Display Technologies segment in 2011, compared to 2010, was driven primarily by the favorable impact of movements in foreign exchange rates. Net sales of this segment are denominated in Japanese yen and, as a result, are susceptible to movements in the U.S. dollar-Japanese yen exchange rate. Volume growth in 2011 was more than offset by price declines, when compared to 2010.

When compared to 2010, the decrease in equity earnings from Samsung Corning Precision Materials in 2011 reflected volume and price declines, offset somewhat by the favorable impact of movements in foreign exchange rates. Equity earnings of Samsung Corning Precision Materials are impacted by movements in both the U.S. dollar - Japanese yen and U.S. dollar - Korean won exchange rates. The impact of the supply chain contraction and excess capacity in 2011 has been more severe in Korea, resulting in higher price and volume declines at Samsung Corning Precision Materials than at our wholly-owned business. Additionally, in the fourth quarter of 2011, although Samsung Corning Precision Materials significantly reduced its glass pricing in light of the current state of glass supply in the industry, it did not recover market share that was lost in the third quarter. Due to these market dynamics, Samsung Corning Precision Materials reduced its glass melting capacity, as described above. Equity earnings were also negatively impacted by higher taxes due to the partial expiration of a Korean tax holiday and the absence of a $61 million credit for our share of a revised tax holiday calculation agreed to by the Korean National Tax service recorded in 2010.

When compared to 2010, the decrease in net income in the Display Technologies segment in 2011 reflects the impact of lower equity earnings, price declines and a decrease in royalty income, partially offset by improved manufacturing efficiency and the favorable impact of foreign exchange rate movements. Net income was also negatively impacted by the absence of a pre-tax credit recorded in 2010 in the amount of $324 million as settlement of business interruption and property damage insurance claims.

Other Information The Display Technologies segment has a concentrated customer base comprised of LCD panel and color filter makers primarily located in Japan, China and Taiwan.

In 2012, three customers of the Display Technologies segment, which individually accounted for more than 10% of segment net sales, accounted for a combined 63% of total segment sales. For 2011, four customers of the Display Technologies segment, which individually accounted for more than 10% of segment net sales, accounted for 77% of total segment sales. For 2010, three customers of the Display Technologies segment, which individually accounted for more than 10% of segment net sales, accounted for 72% of total segment sales. Our customers face the same global economic dynamics as we do in this market. Our near-term sales and profitability would be impacted if any of these significant customers were unable to continue to purchase our products.

In addition, Samsung Corning Precision Materials' sales are concentrated across a small number of its customers. In 2012, 2011 and 2010, sales to two LCD panel makers located in Korea accounted for approximately 93% of Samsung Corning Precision Materials sales in each of those three years.

Corning has invested heavily to expand capacity to meet the projected demand for LCD glass substrates. In 2012, 2011, and 2010, capital spending in this segment was $853 million, $1.3 billion, and $497 million, respectively. We expect capital spending for 2013 to be approximately $500 million, of which approximately $200 million will be related to spending on 2012 capital projects.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 24 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents Outlook: We expect the overall LCD glass retail market to be up mid-to-high single digits in 2013, from 3.5 billion square feet in 2012. We believe that the long-term market drivers will be LCD television growth, driven by growth of larger-sized LCD televisions and increased demand in emerging regions.

In the first quarter of 2013, we expect volume at our wholly-owned business and our segment equity affiliates to increase when compared to the first quarter of 2012, but to be down sequentially by mid-single digits. We expect price declines in our wholly owned business in the first quarter of 2013 to be more moderate when compared to the previous quarter, and for price declines at our segment equity affiliates to be consistent with the prior quarter.

The end market demand for LCD televisions, monitors and notebooks is dependent on consumer retail spending, among other things. We are cautious about the potential negative impacts that economic conditions, particularly a global economic recession, excess market capacity and world political tensions could have on consumer demand. While the industry has grown rapidly in recent years, economic volatility along with consumer preferences for panels of differing sizes, prices, or other factors may lead to pauses in market growth. Therefore, it is possible that glass manufacturing capacity may exceed demand from time to time. We may incur further charges in this segment to reduce our workforce and consolidate capacity. In addition, changes in foreign exchange rates, principally the Japanese yen, will continue to impact the sales and profitability of this segment.

Telecommunications % change (dollars in millions) 2012 2011 2010 12 vs. 11 11 vs. 10 Net sales: Optical fiber and cable $ 1,102 $ 1,051 $ 878 5 20 Hardware and equipment 1,028 1,021 834 1 22 Total net sales $ 2,130 $ 2,072 $ 1,712 3 21 Net income $ 155 $ 195 $ 98 (21 ) 99 2012 vs. 2011 Net sales for the segment were up slightly when compared to 2011, driven by increased demand for optical fiber and cable in China, fiber-to-the-premises products in Australia, and wireless products. This growth was offset somewhat by declines in demand for legacy copper products and the negative impact of foreign exchange rate movements.

The decrease in net income in 2012 reflects the impact of restructuring actions, lower sales of premium fiber products, an increase in research and development expenses, an increase in project spending, and the absence of a contingent liability reversal recorded in 2011 in the amount of $27 million. Somewhat offsetting the decrease in net income was a translation gain in the amount of $52 million for the liquidation of a foreign subsidiary recorded in the fourth quarter of 2012 and the partial reversal of a warranty reserve related to our fiber-to-the-premises and fiber optic cable products in the pre-tax amount of $10 million, recorded in the third quarter of 2012. Net income of this segment in 2012 included approximately $39 million of restructuring charges associated with the Company's corporate-wide restructuring plan, which included headcount reductions, asset write-offs and the write-off of a small equity affiliate in Japan. Movements in foreign exchange rates did not significantly impact net income of this segment.

The Telecommunications segment has a concentrated customer base. In the years ended December 31, 2012, 2011, and 2010, one customer, which individually accounted for more than 10% of segment net sales, accounted for 12%, 12%, and 15%, respectively, of total segment net sales.

2011 vs. 2010 In 2011, net sales of the Telecommunications segment increased when compared to 2010 due to higher sales in all of the segment's product lines, led by fiber-to-the-premises, optical fiber and cable, and enterprise network products.

Sales of fiber-to-the-premises products increased 39%, driven by initiatives in Canada, Europe and Australia. Optical fiber and cable sales growth reflected record volume, moderating price declines and an increase in sales of premium products. Sales also increased due to a small acquisition completed in the first quarter of 2011 and the positive impact from movements in foreign exchange rates.

The increase in net income in 2011 when compared to 2010 reflects higher volume across all product lines and an increase in sales of higher margin products, coupled with a credit in the amount of $27 million for the decrease in a contingent liability associated with a first quarter acquisition. The increase in net income was offset slightly by the impact of higher raw materials and project costs associated with our initiatives in Australia and Europe. Movements in foreign exchange rates did not have a significant impact on the comparability of net income for the periods presented.

Outlook: We expect a strong year of sales growth in the Telecommunications segment in 2013, driven by an increase in global demand for our optical fiber and cable, a significant ramp-up of our fiber-to-the-premises initiative in Australia and strong growth of our enterprise network products. In the first quarter of 2013, we expect net sales of this segment to increase when compared to the same period last year.

Changes in our customers' expected deployment plans, or additional reductions in their inventory levels of fiber-to-the-premises products, could also affect sales levels. Should these plans not occur at the pace anticipated, our sales and earnings would be adversely affected.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 25 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents Environmental Technologies % change (dollars in millions) 2012 2011 2010 12 vs. 11 11 vs. 10 Net sales: Automotive $ 486 $ 476 $ 462 2 3 Diesel 478 522 354 (8 ) 47 Total net sales $ 964 $ 998 $ 816 (3 ) 22 Net income $ 115 $ 121 $ 43 (5 ) 181 2012 vs. 2011 Net sales of this segment decreased in 2012 when compared to 2011, due to a decline in net sales of our diesel products and the negative impact of movements in foreign exchange rates. Although sales of light duty diesel products decreased due to a decline in demand for vehicles in Europe requiring light duty diesel filters, sales of our heavy duty diesel products increased 8% in 2012, partially offsetting the decrease in light duty diesel sales. During the latter half of 2012, however, the rate of growth of heavy duty products declined, driven by a slowing of Class 8 truck orders in North America. Sales of our automotive products increased in 2012, when compared to 2011, on continued growth in worldwide automotive production, led by growth in North America.

Net income in 2012 decreased slightly, driven by a decrease in sales of light duty diesel products, offset somewhat by an increase in heavy duty diesel volume, improved manufacturing performance and a decrease in air freight costs, when compared to the same period last year. In 2012, net income of this segment included approximately $3 million, before tax, of restructuring charges associated with the Company's corporate-wide restructuring plan to reduce its global workforce. Movements in foreign exchange rates did not have a significant impact on the comparability of net income for the periods presented.

The Environmental Technologies segment sells to a concentrated customer base of catalyzer and emission control systems manufacturers, who then sell to automotive and diesel engine manufacturers. Although our sales are to the emission control systems manufacturers, the use of our substrates and filters is generally required by the specifications of the automotive and diesel vehicle or engine manufacturers. For 2012, 2011, and 2010, net sales to three customers, which individually accounted for more than 10% of segment sales, accounted for 86%, 85%, and 86%, respectively, of total segment sales. While we are not aware of any significant customer credit issues with our direct customers, our near-term sales and profitability would be impacted if any individual customers were unable to continue to purchase our products.

2011 vs. 2010 When compared to 2010, net sales in the Environmental Technologies segment increased in 2011, primarily due to higher sales of diesel products. The increase was driven by an increase in truck production in the United States, implementation of European governmental regulations on light duty diesel vehicles, and the first stages of the implementation of off-road vehicle regulations in the United States. Sales of our automotive products also increased slightly in 2011, when compared to 2010, reflecting the continuing growth of worldwide automotive production. Net sales of this segment in 2011 were not materially impacted by movements in foreign exchange rates when compared to 2010.

Net income in 2011 increased 181%, when compared to 2010, due to higher sales volume for our diesel products, combined with reduced air freight expense and improved manufacturing performance in both diesel and automotive product lines.

The increase in net income was slightly offset by higher depreciation and project costs on manufacturing capacity expansion. Movements in foreign exchange rates in 2011 did not materially impact the results of this segment when compared to 2010.

Outlook: In 2013, we anticipate that the worldwide auto and heavy-duty diesel truck markets should grow when compared to 2012. We expect net sales of this segment to decline in the first quarter of 2013, when compared to record quarterly sales in the same period last year.

Specialty Materials % change (dollars in millions) 2012 2011 2010 12 vs. 11 11 vs. 10 Net sales $ 1,346 $ 1,074 $ 578 25 86 Net income (loss) $ 142 $ (36 ) $ (32 ) * 13 * The percentage change calculation is not meaningful.

2012 vs. 2011 The Specialty Materials segment manufactures products that provide more than 150 material formulations for glass, glass ceramics and fluoride crystals to meet demand for unique customer needs. Consequently, this segment operates in a wide variety of commercial and industrial markets that include display optics and components, semiconductor optics components, aerospace and defense, astronomy, ophthalmic products, telecommunications components and a protective cover glass that is optimized for portable display devices and televisions.

Net sales in 2012 increased in the Specialty Materials segment when compared to the same period in 2011, driven by a significant increase in sales volume of Corning Gorilla Glass. Sales of Corning Gorilla Glass have continued to increase due to a combination of strong retail demand for handheld display devices, tablets and notebook computers, and an increase in usage of our glass on these devices. Moderate price declines for Corning Gorilla Glass and lower sales of our advanced optics products partially offset the increase in net sales.

Movements in foreign exchange rates did not significantly impact net sales of this reportable segment in 2012.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 26 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents When compared to the same period last year, the increase in net income in 2012 was driven by the increase in sales of Corning Gorilla Glass, combined with increased manufacturing efficiency and the absence of large cover glass start-up and tank conversion costs incurred in 2011. Also impacting results of this segment was the net positive difference in large cover glass asset write-offs in 2012 versus 2011 in the pre-tax amount of $86 million. Net income included approximately $10 million (pre-tax) of restructuring charges associated with the Company's corporate-wide restructuring plan, which included headcount reductions and asset write-offs related to our advanced optics product line. Net income was not significantly impacted from movements in foreign exchange rates when compared to the same period in 2011.

For 2012, two customers of the Specialty Materials segment, which individually accounted for more than 10% of segment sales, accounted for 54% of total segment sales. For 2011, two customers of the Specialty Materials segment, which individually accounted for more than 10% of segment sales, accounted for 42% of total segment sales. For 2010, three customers of the Specialty Materials segment, which individually accounted for more than 10% of segment sales, accounted for 43% of total segment sales.

2011 vs. 2010 Net sales in 2011 increased significantly in the Specialty Materials segment, driven by sales of Corning Gorilla Glass, which more than doubled when compared to 2010, and a modest increase in semiconductor optics and aerospace and defense products. Movements in foreign exchange rates did not significantly impact net sales of this segment in 2011. Sales of Corning Gorilla Glass increased considerably, especially during the first nine months of 2011, due to a combination of strong retail demand for handheld display devices, tablets and notebook computers, and increased usage of our glass on these devices. Although sales of Corning Gorilla Glass used in our large cover glass products increased in 2011 when compared to 2010, sales were significantly below our expectations in 2011 and are expected to be lower than forecasted in 2012. As a result, certain assets located in Japan used in the ion exchange process for the production of large cover glass were impaired in the fourth quarter of 2011.

This asset group includes machinery and equipment used in the ion exchange process and facilities dedicated to the ion exchange process. The Specialty Materials segment reduced capacity for its Corning Gorilla Glass products, including the impairment of large cover glass assets, in the fourth quarter of 2011 as part of Corning's worldwide capacity reduction of approximately 25%.

The slight increase in net loss in 2011 when compared to 2010 was driven by the large cover glass asset impairment charge in the amount of $130 million (pre-tax), offset by the considerable increase in sales volume of our Corning Gorilla Glass used in handheld display devices, tablets and notebook computers.

Net income was also impacted somewhat by declines in manufacturing efficiency caused primarily by start-up costs for large cover glass and glass tank conversions necessary to increase manufacturing capacity for Corning Gorilla Glass in 2011, as well as the negative impact of movements in foreign exchange rates.

Outlook: For 2013, we expect double digit market growth for Corning Gorilla Glass, driven by its continued popularity as a cover glass for smartphones and tablets, and the emergence of touch technology on notebook computers. In the first quarter of 2013, we expect net sales to decline sequentially and compared to the same period in 2012.

Life Sciences % change (dollars in millions) 2012 2011 2010 12 vs. 11 11 vs. 10 Net sales $ 657 $ 595 $ 508 10 17 Net income $ 31 $ 61 $ 60 (49 ) 2 2012 vs. 2011 Net sales in 2012 increased due to the impact of the acquisition of the majority of the Discovery Labware business, which was completed in the fourth quarter of 2012, and a small acquisition completed in the fourth quarter of 2011, as well as a slight increase in the segment's existing product lines. The acquisitions support the Company's strategy to expand Corning's portfolio of life sciences products and enhance global customer access in this business, and accounted for $65 million of the increase in sales in 2012 when compared to 2011. The negative impact of foreign exchange rate movements partially offset the increase in sales.

The decrease in net income in 2012 reflects the impact of higher raw materials costs and operating expenses in the amount of $22 million related to the acquisition of a majority of the Discovery Labware business, which more than offset the favorable impact of the increase in net sales. Also negatively impacting net income of this segment in 2012 was approximately $2 million of restructuring charges associated with the Company's corporate-wide restructuring plan to reduce global headcount. Net income in 2012 was not significantly impacted by movements in foreign exchange rates when compared to the same period in 2011.

For 2012, 2011, and 2010, two customers in the Life Sciences segment, which individually accounted for more than 10% of total segment net sales, collectively accounted for 38%, 39%, and 37%, respectively, of total segment sales.

2011 vs. 2010 Net sales in 2011 increased when compared to 2010 due to a small acquisition completed in the fourth quarter of 2010 and higher sales in the segment's existing product lines. Net sales in 2011 were not significantly impacted by movements in foreign exchange rates when compared to 2010.

Net income in 2011 was consistent with 2010, reflecting costs for manufacturing expansion projects, higher raw materials costs and the impact of the integration of the acquisition completed in 2010, offset by modest volume and price increases. Net income of this segment was not significantly impacted by movements in foreign exchange rates when compared to 2010.

Outlook: Sales in the Life Sciences segment are expected to increase in both the first quarter and full year of 2013, primarily due to the impact of the Discovery Labware business acquisition completed in the fourth quarter of 2012.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 27 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents All Other % change (dollars in millions) 2012 2011 2010 12 vs. 11 11 vs. 10 Net sales $ 6 $ 6 $ 7 0 (14 ) Research, development and engineering expenses $ 124 $ 98 $ 114 27 (14 ) Equity earnings of affiliated companies $ 17 $ 15 $ 45 13 (67 ) Net loss $ (98 ) $ (78 ) $ (75 ) 26 4 All Other includes all other segments that do not meet the quantitative threshold for separate reporting. This group is primarily comprised of development projects that involve the use of various technologies for new products such as advanced flow reactors, thin-film photovoltaics and adjacency businesses in pursuit of thin, strong glass. This segment also includes results for certain corporate investments such as Samsung Corning Precision Materials' non-LCD glass businesses, Eurokera and Keraglass equity affiliates, which manufacture smooth cooktop glass/ceramic products, and Corsam Technologies LLC (Corsam), an equity affiliate established between Corning and Samsung Corning Precision Materials to provide glass technology research. Refer to Note 7 (Investments) to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information about Samsung Corning Precision Materials and related party transactions.

2012 vs. 2011 The results of this segment for the year ended 2012, when compared to the same period last year, reflect an increase in research, development and engineering expenses for development projects, offset by a gain on the sale of assets in Samsung Corning Precision Materials' non-LCD glass business.

2011 vs. 2010 The increase in net loss in 2011 when compared to 2010 in this segment was driven by lower equity earnings from Samsung Corning Precision Materials' non-LCD glass businesses, partially offset by lower research, development and engineering expenses.

Liquidity and Capital Resources Financing and Capital Structure The following items impacted Corning's financing and capital structure during 2012 and 2011: • In the first quarter of 2012, we issued $500 million of 4.75% senior unsecured notes that mature on March 15, 2042 and $250 million of 4.70% senior unsecured notes that mature on March 15, 2037. The net proceeds of $742 million will be used for general corporate purposes.

• In the fourth quarter of 2012, we completed the following debt-related transactions: - We issued $250 million of 1.45% senior unsecured notes that mature on November 15, 2017. The net proceeds of $248 million from the offering will be used for general corporate purposes.

- We repurchased $13 million of our 8.875% senior unsecured notes due 2021, $11 million of our 8.875% senior unsecured notes due 2016, and $51 million of our 6.75% senior unsecured notes due 2013. Additionally, we redeemed $100 million of our 5.90% senior unsecured notes due 2014 and $74 million of our 6.20% senior unsecured notes due 2016. We recognized a pre-tax loss of $26 million upon the early redemption of these notes.

• In the fourth quarter of 2012, Corning's Board of Directors declared a 20% increase in the company's quarterly common stock dividend. Corning's quarterly dividend increased from $0.075 per share to $0.09 per share of common stock.

• On October 5, 2011, Corning's Board of Directors approved the repurchase of up to $1.5 billion of common stock between the date of the announcement and December 31, 2013. Corning finalized the repurchase program in the fourth quarter of 2012, and repurchased a total of 111 million shares for $1.5 billion during the program.

• In the second quarter of 2011, a wholly-owned subsidiary entered into a credit facility that allows Corning to borrow up to Chinese Renminbi (RMB) 4.0 billion, or approximately $642 million when translated to United States dollars. Corning was able to request advances during the eighteen month period beginning on June 30, 2011 (the "Availability Period"). The time period for Corning to draw under the RMB facility expired at the end of 2012. Our financing agreement requires us to repay the aggregate principal amount and accrued interest outstanding at the end of the Availability Period in six installments, with the final payment due in August 2016, five years from the date of the first advance.

Corning also has the right to repay this loan in full at pre-determined dates with no pre-payment penalty. In 2012, we borrowed the equivalent of approximately $377 million from this credit facility.

Capital Spending Capital spending was $1.8 billion in 2012, a decrease of $631 million when compared to 2011. In 2010, Corning announced several multi-year investment plans to increase manufacturing capacity in several of our reportable segments.

Specifically, the projects focused on an LCD glass substrate facility in China for our Display Technologies segment and a capacity expansion project for Specialty Materials' Corning Gorilla Glass in Japan. Although spending for these projects continued into 2012, the majority of the construction costs were incurred in 2011, resulting in a significant decrease in capital spending in those segments in 2012. Slightly offsetting the decline was an increase in capital spending in the Telecommunications segment, driven by capacity expansion in our fiber business. We expect our 2013 capital expenditures to be approximately $1.3 billion. Approximately $500 million will be allocated to our Display Technologies segment, of which approximately $200 million will be related to spending on 2012 capital projects.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 28 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents Cash Flows Summary of cash flow data (in millions): Years ended December 31, 2012 2011 2010 Net cash provided by operating activities $ 3,206 $ 3,189 $ 3,835 Net cash used in investing activities $ (2,628 ) $ (2,056 ) $ (1,769 ) Net cash used in financing activities $ (115 ) $ (980 ) $ (2 ) 2012 vs. 2011 Although 2012 net income declined when compared to 2011, operating cash flow remained relatively consistent. The decrease in net income resulted primarily from the non-cash impacts of significantly lower equity earnings and the absence of the positive impact of movements in foreign exchange rates experienced in 2011. The cash impact of higher dividends and a net positive change in working capital also effected operating cash flow.

Net cash used in investing activities increased in 2012 when compared to 2011, due to the acquisition of the majority of the Discovery Labware business from Becton, Dickinson and Company, an investment in an affiliated company, and lower cash received from short-term investment liquidations, offset slightly by a decrease in capital spending.

Net cash used in financing activities decreased in 2012 when compared to 2011, primarily due to the proceeds received from the issuance of long-term debt, coupled with a decline in cash used for stock repurchases in 2012. Somewhat offsetting the decrease in net cash used were the impacts of retiring long-term debt and a decline in proceeds received from the exercise of stock options.

2011 vs. 2010 Net cash provided by operating activities decreased in 2011 when compared to 2010, driven largely by a non-recurring special dividend of almost $900 million received from Samsung Corning Precision Materials in 2010 and a decrease in cash from changes in working capital. Additionally, in 2011, we received $66 million for the remainder of the settlement of business interruption and property damage insurance claims, a decrease of $193 million from the amount we received in 2010 as partial payment for these claims. These negative events were partially offset by a $350 million decrease in contributions to our defined benefit pension plans in 2011.

Net cash used in investing activities was higher in 2011 when compared to 2010 due to an increase in capital spending and two small acquisitions completed in 2011. Capital spending was driven primarily by capacity projects to support growth in demand in our Display Technologies and Specialty Materials segments.

The increase in net cash used in investing activities was partially offset by higher cash received from short-term investments liquidations.

Net cash used in financing activities increased in 2011 when compared to 2010, driven by common stock repurchases and an increase in our dividend rate from $0.05 per share to $0.075 per share in the fourth quarter of 2011.

Defined Benefit Pension Plans We have defined benefit pension plans covering certain domestic and international employees. Our largest single pension plan is Corning's U.S.

qualified plan. At December 31, 2012, this plan accounted for 80% of our consolidated defined benefit pension plans' projected benefit obligation and 90% of the related plans' assets.

We have historically contributed to the U.S. qualified pension plan on an annual basis in excess of the IRS minimum requirements, and as a result, mandatory contributions are not expected to be required for this plan until sometime after 2013. In 2012, we made voluntary cash contributions of $75 million to our domestic defined benefit pension plan and $30 million to our international pension plans. In 2011, we made no voluntary cash contributions to our domestic defined benefit pension plan and $5 million to our international pension plans.

Although we will not be subject to any mandatory contributions in 2013, we anticipate making voluntary cash contributions of up to $60 million to our U.S.

pension plan and up to $5 million to our international pension plans in 2013.

Refer to Note 13 (Employee Retirement Plans) to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

Restructuring In response to uncertain global economic conditions, and the potential for slower 2013 growth in many of our businesses, Corning implemented a corporate-wide restructuring plan in the fourth quarter of 2012. We recorded charges of $89 million which included costs for workforce reductions, asset disposals and write-offs, and exit costs. Total cash expenditures associated with these actions are expected to be approximately $49 million, with the majority of spending for employee-related costs completed by 2013. Annualized savings from these actions are estimated to be approximately $71 million and will be reflected largely in selling, general, and administrative expenses.

During 2012, 2011, and 2010, we made payments of $8 million, $16 million, and $66 million, respectively, related to employee severance and other exit costs resulting from restructuring actions. Refer to Note 2 (Restructuring, Impairment and Other Charges (Credits)) to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 29 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents Key Balance Sheet Data Balance sheet and working capital measures are provided in the following table (dollars in millions): December 31, 2012 2011 Working capital $ 7,739 $ 6,580 Current ratio 5.0:1 4.1:1 Trade accounts receivable, net of allowances $ 1,302 $ 1,082 Days sales outstanding 55 52 Inventories $ 1,051 $ 975 Inventory turns 4.6 4.7 Days payable outstanding(1) 42 42 Long-term debt $ 3, 382 $ 2,364 TOTAL DEBT TO TOTAL CAPITAL 14 % 10 % (1) Includes trade payables only.

Credit Ratings As of February 13, 2013, our credit ratings were as follows: Rating Agency Rating long-term debt Outlook last update Fitch A- Stable May 17, 2011 Standard & Poor's BBB+ Positive February 14, 2012 Moody's A3 Stable September 12, 2011 Management Assessment of Liquidity We ended the fourth quarter of 2012 with over $6.1 billion of cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments. The Company has adequate sources of liquidity and we are confident in our ability to generate cash to meet existing or reasonably likely future cash requirements. Our cash, cash equivalents, and short-term investments are held in various locations throughout the world and are generally unrestricted. At December 31, 2012, approximately 75% of the consolidated amount was held outside of the U.S. Almost all of the amounts held outside of the U.S. are available for repatriation, subject to relevant tax consequences. We utilize a variety of tax effective financing strategies to ensure that our worldwide cash is available in the locations in which it is needed. In the fourth quarter of 2010, we repatriated to the U.S. approximately $1.1 billion of 2010 earnings from certain foreign subsidiaries. We expect previously accumulated non-U.S. cash balances will remain outside of the U.S. In addition to the cash repatriated in 2010, we expect that we will meet U.S.

liquidity needs through future cash flows, use of U.S. cash balances, external borrowings, or some combination of these sources.

Realized gains and losses for 2012, 2011, and 2010 were not significant.

Volatility in financial markets may limit Corning's access to capital markets and result in terms and conditions that by historical comparisons are more restrictive and costly to Corning. Still, from time to time, we may issue debt, the proceeds of which may be used to refinance certain debt maturities and for general corporate purposes. In February 2013, the Company obtained authorization from the Board of Directors to execute a series of foreign exchange contracts over a two year period to hedge our exposure to movements in the Japanese yen and its impact on our earnings. The Company's execution of these contracts will be dependent upon market conditions. The foreign exchange contracts will not be designated derivatives and will be marked to market through the other income line, and could be material to our consolidated statements of income.

During 2012 and 2011, we repurchased 56 million and 55 million shares of common stock for $720 million and $780 million, respectively, as part of a share repurchase program announced on October 5, 2011. There were no repurchases in 2010.

We complete comprehensive reviews of our significant customers and their creditworthiness by analyzing their financial strength at least annually or more frequently for customers where we have identified a measure of increased risk.

We closely monitor payments and developments which may signal possible customer credit issues. We currently have not identified any potential material impact on our liquidity resulting from customer credit issues.

Our major source of funding for 2012 and beyond will be our operating cash flow and our existing balances of cash, cash equivalents, short-term investments, as well as proceeds from any potential issuances of debt. We believe we have sufficient liquidity for the next several years to fund operations, the asbestos litigation, research and development, capital expenditures, scheduled debt repayments, and current dividend payments.

Corning has access to a $1.0 billion unsecured committed revolving line of credit. We also have amounts outstanding of $497 million under a 4.0 billion Chinese Renminbi (RMB) credit facility (approximately $642 million when translated to USD). The time period for Corning to draw under the RMB facility expired at the end of 2012. These two credit facilities include two financial covenants: a leverage ratio and an interest coverage ratio. The required leverage ratio, which measures debt to total capital, is a maximum of 50%. At December 31, 2012 and 2011, our leverage using this measure was 14% and 10%, respectively. The required interest coverage ratio, which is an adjusted earnings measure as defined by our facility, compared to interest expense, is a ratio of at least 3.5 times. At December 31, 2012 and 2011, our interest coverage ratio using this measure was 36.0 times and 41.7 times, respectively.

At December 31, 2012 and 2011, we were in compliance with both financial covenants.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 30 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents Our debt instruments contain customary event of default provisions, which allow the lenders the option of accelerating all obligations upon the occurrence of certain events. In addition, the majority of our debt instruments contain a cross default provision, whereby a default on one debt obligation of the Company in excess of a specified amount, also would be considered a default under the terms of another debt instrument. As of December 31, 2012, we were in compliance with all such provisions.

Management is not aware of any known trends, demands, commitments, events or uncertainties that will result in or that are reasonably likely to result in a material increase or decrease in our liquidity. In addition, other than items discussed, there are no known material trends, favorable or unfavorable, in our capital resources and no expected material changes in the mix and relative cost of such resources.

Off Balance Sheet Arrangements Off balance sheet arrangements are transactions, agreements, or other contractual arrangements with an unconsolidated entity for which Corning has an obligation to the entity that is not recorded in our consolidated financial statements.

Corning's off balance sheet arrangements include the following: • Guarantee contracts; and • Variable interests held in certain unconsolidated entities.

At the time a guarantee is issued, the Company is required to recognize a liability for the fair value or market value of the obligation it assumes. In the normal course of our business, we do not routinely provide significant third-party guarantees. Generally, third-party guarantees provided by Corning are limited to certain financial guarantees, including stand-by letters of credit and performance bonds, and the incurrence of contingent liabilities in the form of purchase price adjustments related to attainment of milestones.

These guarantees have various terms, and none of these guarantees are individually significant.

Refer to Note 14 (Commitments, Contingencies, and Guarantees) to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

For variable interest entities, we assess the terms of our interest in each entity to determine if we are the primary beneficiary. The primary beneficiary of a variable interest entity is the party that absorbs a majority of the entity's expected losses, receives a majority of its expected residual returns, or both, as a result of holding variable interests, which are the ownership, contractual, or other pecuniary interests in an entity that change with changes in the fair value of the entity's net assets excluding variable interests.

Corning has identified four entities that qualify as variable interest entities.

None of these entities is considered to be significant to Corning's consolidated statements of position.

Corning does not have retained interests in assets transferred to an unconsolidated entity that serve as credit, liquidity or market risk support to that entity.

Contractual Obligations The amounts of our obligations follow (in millions): Amount of commitment and contingency expiration per period 5 years and Total Less than 1 year 1 to 2 years 2 to 3 years 3 to 4 years thereafter Performance bonds and guarantees $ 35 $ 22 $ 3 $ 5 $ 5 Credit facilities for equity companies 50 25 25 Stand-by letters of credit(1) 57 57 Subtotal of commitment expirations per period $ 142 $ 104 $ 28 $ 5 $ 5 Purchase obligations $ 89 $ 37 $ 21 $ 11 $ 9 $ 11 Capital expenditure obligations(2) 240 240 Total debt(3) 3,214 73 295 136 154 2,556 Interest on long-term debt(4) 2,853 160 165 151 144 2,233 Minimum rental commitments 834 383 200 149 28 74 Capital leases(3) 216 3 2 3 3 205 Imputed interest on capital leases 135 12 12 12 12 87 Uncertain tax positions(5) 4 2 2 Subtotal of contractual obligation payments due by period 7,585 910 697 462 350 5,166 TOTAL COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES $ 7,727 $ 1,014 $ 725 $ 467 $ 350 $ 5,171 (1) At December 31, 2012, $41 million of the $57 million was included in other accrued liabilities on our consolidated balance sheets.

(2) Capital expenditure obligations primarily reflect amounts associated with our capital expansion activities.

(3) At December 31, 2012, $3.4 billion was included on our balance sheet. Total debt above is stated at maturity value.

(4) The estimate of interest payments assumes interest is paid through the date of maturity or expiration of the related debt, based upon stated rates in the respective debt instruments.

(5) At December 31, 2012, $6 million was included on our balance sheet related to uncertain tax positions. Of this amount, we are unable to estimate when $2 million of that amount will become payable.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 31 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents We are required, at the time a guarantee is issued, to recognize a liability for the fair value or market value of the obligation it assumes. In the normal course of our business, we do not routinely provide significant third-party guarantees. Generally, third-party guarantees provided by Corning are limited to certain financial guarantees, including stand-by letters of credit and performance bonds, and the incurrence of contingent liabilities in the form of purchase price adjustments related to attainment of milestones. These guarantees have various terms, and none of these guarantees are individually significant.

Additionally, we have agreed to provide a credit facility related to Dow Corning. The funding of the Dow Corning credit facility will be required only if Dow Corning is not otherwise able to meet its scheduled funding obligations in its confirmed Bankruptcy Plan. We believe a significant majority of these guarantees and contingent liabilities will expire without being funded.

Environment Corning has been named by the Environmental Protection Agency (the Agency) under the Superfund Act, or by state governments under similar state laws, as a potentially responsible party for 17 active hazardous waste sites. Under the Superfund Act, all parties who may have contributed any waste to a hazardous waste site, identified by the Agency, are jointly and severally liable for the cost of cleanup unless the Agency agrees otherwise. It is Corning's policy to accrue for its estimated liability related to Superfund sites and other environmental liabilities related to property owned by Corning based on expert analysis and continual monitoring by both internal and external consultants. At December 31, 2012 and 2011, Corning had accrued approximately $21 million (undiscounted) and $25 million (undiscounted), respectively, for its estimated liability for environmental cleanup and related litigation. Based upon the information developed to date, management believes that the accrued reserve is a reasonable estimate of the Company's liability and that the risk of an additional loss in an amount materially higher than that accrued is remote.

Critical Accounting Estimates The preparation of financial statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect amounts reported therein. The estimates that required us to make difficult, subjective or complex judgments, including future projections of performance and relevant discount rates, follow.

Impairment of assets held for use We are required to assess the recoverability of the carrying value of long-lived assets when an indicator of impairment has been identified. We review our long-lived assets in each quarter to assess whether impairment indicators are present. We must exercise judgment in assessing whether an event of impairment has occurred.

Manufacturing equipment includes certain components of production equipment that are constructed of precious metals, primarily platinum and rhodium. These metals are not depreciated because they have very low physical losses and are repeatedly reclaimed and reused in our manufacturing process over a very long useful life. Precious metals are reviewed for impairment as part of our assessment of long-lived assets. This review considers all of the Company's precious metals that are either in place in the production process; in reclamation, fabrication, or refinement in anticipation of re-use; or awaiting use to support increased capacity. Precious metals are only acquired to support our operations and are not held for trading or other non-manufacturing related purposes.

Examples of events or circumstances that may be indicative of impairments include: • A significant decrease in the market price of an asset; • A significant change in the extent or manner in which a long-lived asset is being used or in its physical condition; • A significant adverse change in legal factors or in the business climate that could affect the value of the asset, including an adverse action or assessment by a regulator; • An accumulation of costs significantly in excess of the amount originally expected for the acquisition or construction of an asset; • A current-period operating or cash flow loss combined with a history of operating or cash flow losses or a projection or forecast that demonstrates continuing losses associated with the use of an asset; and • A current expectation that, more likely than not, an asset will be sold or otherwise disposed of significantly before the end of its previously estimated useful life.

For purposes of recognition and measurement of an impairment loss, a long-lived asset or assets is grouped with other assets and liabilities at the lowest level for which identifiable cash flows are largely independent of the cash flows of other assets and liabilities. We must exercise judgment in assessing the lowest level for which identifiable cash flows are largely independent of the cash flows of other assets and liabilities. For the majority of our reportable segments, we concluded that locations or businesses which share production along the supply chain must be combined in order to appropriately identify cash flows that are largely independent of the cash flows of other assets and liabilities.

For long-lived assets, when impairment indicators are present, we compare estimated undiscounted future cash flows, including the eventual disposition of the asset group at market value, to the assets' carrying value to determine if the asset group is recoverable. This assessment requires the exercise of judgment in assessing the future use of and projected value to be derived from the assets to be held and used. Assessments also consider changes in asset utilization, including the temporary idling of capacity and the expected timing for placing this capacity back into production. If there is an impairment, a loss is recorded to reflect the difference between the assets' fair value and carrying value. This may require judgment in estimating future cash flows and relevant discount rates and residual values in estimating the current fair value of the impaired assets to be held and used.

For an asset group that fails the test of recoverability described above, the estimated fair value of long-lived assets is determined using an "income approach", "market approach", "cost approach", or a combination of one or more of these approaches as appropriate for the particular asset group being reviewed. All of these approaches start with the forecast of expected future net cash flows including the eventual disposition at market value of long-lived assets, and also considers the fair market value of all precious metals if appropriate for the asset group being reviewed. Some of the more significant estimates and assumptions in our analysis include: market size and growth, market share, projected selling prices, manufacturing cost and discount rate.

Our estimates are based upon our historical experience, our commercial relationships, and available external information about future trends. We believe fair value assessments are most sensitive to market growth and the corresponding impact on volume and selling prices and that these are also more subjective than manufacturing cost and other assumptions. The Company believes its current assumptions and estimates are reasonable and appropriate.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 32 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents In the event the current net book value of an asset group is found to be greater than the net present value of the cash flows derived from the asset group, we determine the actual fair market value of long-lived assets with the assistance from valuation appraisals conducted by third parties. The results of these valuations generally represent the fair market value of the asset group that will remain after any necessary impairment adjustments have been recorded. The impairment charge will be allocated to assets within the asset group on a relative fair value basis.

At December 31, 2012, the carrying value of precious metals was higher than the fair value by $28 million. At December 31, 2011, the carrying value of precious metals was higher than the fair market value by $304 million. In both reporting periods, the undiscounted cash flow test shows that these precious metal assets, primarily in the Display Technologies segment, are recoverable as part of their asset groupings. The potential for impairment exists in the future if negative events significantly decrease the cash flow of our segments. Such events include, but are not limited to, a significant decrease in demand for products or a significant decrease in profitability in our Display Technologies or Specialty Materials segments.

The Specialty Materials segment recorded an impairment charge in the fourth quarter of 2011 in the amount of $130 million related to certain assets used in the production of large cover glass due to sales that were significantly below our expectations. In the fourth quarter of 2012, after reassessing the large cover glass business, Corning concluded that the large cover glass market was developing differently in 2012 than our expectations, and demand for larger-sized cover glass was declining, and the market for this type of glass was instead targeting smaller gen size products. Additionally, in the fourth quarter of 2012, our primary customer of large cover glass notified Corning of its decision to exit from this display market. Based on these events, we recorded an additional impairment charge in the fourth quarter of 2012 in the amount of $44 million, before tax. This impairment charge represents a write-down of assets specific to the glass-strengthening process for large size cover glass to their fair market values, and includes machinery and equipment used in the ion exchange process. Additional information on the asset impairment is found in Note 2 (Restructuring, Impairment and Other Charges (Credits)), Note 9 (Property, Net of Accumulated Depreciation) and Note 16 (Fair Value Measurements) to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

Impairment of Goodwill We are required to make certain subjective and complex judgments in assessing whether an event of impairment of goodwill has occurred, including assumptions and estimates used to determine the fair value of our reporting units.

Corning's goodwill relates primarily to the Telecommunications, Specialty Materials and Life Sciences operating segments. On a quarterly basis, management performs a qualitative assessment of factors in each reporting unit to determine whether there have been any triggering events. The two-step impairment test is required only if we conclude that it is more likely than not that a reporting unit's fair value is less than its carrying amount. We perform a detailed, two-step process every three years if no indicators suggest a test should be performed in the interim. We use this calculation as quantitative validation of the step-zero qualitative process that is performed during the intervening periods and does not represent an election to perform the two-step process in place of the step-zero review.

The following summarizes our qualitative process to assess our goodwill balances for impairment: • We assess qualitative factors in each of our reporting units which carry goodwill to determine whether it is necessary to perform the first step of the two-step quantitative goodwill impairment test.

• The following events and circumstances are considered when evaluating whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount: - Macroeconomic conditions, such as a deterioration in general economic conditions, fluctuations in foreign exchange rates and/or other developments in equity and credit markets; - Market capital in relation to book value; - Industry and market considerations, such as a deterioration in the environment in which an entity operates, material loss in market share and significant declines in product pricing; - Cost factors, such as an increase in raw materials, labor or other costs; - Overall financial performance, such as negative or declining cash flows or a decline in actual or forecasted revenue; - Other relevant entity-specific events, such as material changes in management or key personnel; and - Events affecting a reporting unit, such as a change in the composition or carrying amount of its net assets including acquisitions and dispositions.

The examples noted above are not all-inclusive, and the Company shall consider other relevant events and circumstances that affect the fair value of a reporting unit in determining whether to perform the first step of the goodwill impairment test.

Our two step goodwill recoverability assessment is based on our annual strategic planning process. This process includes an extensive review of expectations for the long-term growth of our businesses and forecasted future cash flows. Our valuation method is an "income approach" using a discounted cash flow model in which cash flows anticipated over several periods, plus a terminal value at the end of that time horizon, are discounted to their present value using an appropriate rate of return. Our estimates are based upon our historical experience, our current knowledge from our commercial relationships, and available external information about future trends.

Telecommunications Goodwill for the Telecommunications segment is tested at the reporting unit level which is also the operating segment level.

In addition to assessing qualitative factors each quarter, we performed a quantitative goodwill recoverability test in 2012 for this reporting unit. The results of our impairment test indicated that the fair value of the reporting unit exceeded its book value by a significant amount. A discount rate of 9% was used in 2012. We determined a range of discount rates between 7% and 11% would not have affected our conclusion.

Specialty Materials Goodwill for the Specialty Materials segment is tested at the reporting unit level, which is one level below an operating segment, as goodwill is the result of transactions associated with certain businesses within this operating segment. There is only one reporting unit with goodwill within this operating segment.

In addition to assessing qualitative factors each quarter, we performed a quantitative goodwill recoverability test in 2012 for this reporting unit. The results of our impairment test indicated that the fair value of the reporting unit exceeded its book value by a significant amount. A discount rate of 8% was used in 2012. We determined a range of discount rates between 6% and 10% would not have affected our conclusion. Additionally, the asset impairment which occurred in the fourth quarter of 2012 did not cause a triggering event for goodwill impairment in this reporting unit because the cash flow related to this lower level asset group is not material to this reporting unit.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 33 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents Life Sciences Goodwill for the Life Sciences segment is tested at the reporting unit level which is also the operating segment level.

In addition to assessing qualitative factors each quarter, we performed a quantitative goodwill recoverability test in 2012 for this reporting unit. The results of our impairment test indicated that the fair value of the reporting unit exceeded its book value by a significant amount. A discount rate of 7% was used in 2012. We determined a range of discount rates between 5% and 9% would not have affected our conclusion.

Restructuring charges and impairments resulting from restructuring actions We are required to assess whether and when a restructuring event has occurred and in which periods charges related to such events should be recognized. We must estimate costs of plans to restructure including, for example, employee termination costs. Restructuring charges require us to exercise judgment about the expected future of our businesses, of portions thereof, their profitability, cash flows and in certain instances eventual outcome. The judgment involved can be difficult, subjective and complex in a number of areas, including assumptions and estimates used in estimating the future profitability and cash flows of our businesses.

Restructuring events often give rise to decisions to dispose of or abandon certain assets or asset groups which, as a result, require impairment. We are required to carry assets to be sold or abandoned at the lower of cost or fair value. We must exercise judgment in assessing the fair value of the assets to be sold or abandoned.

Income taxes We are required to exercise judgment about our future results in assessing the realizability of our deferred tax assets. Inherent in this estimation process is the requirement for us to estimate future book and taxable income and possible tax planning strategies. These estimates require us to exercise judgment about our future results, the prudence and feasibility of possible tax planning strategies, and the economic environments in which we do business. It is possible that actual results will differ from assumptions and require adjustments to allowances.

Equity method investments At December 31, 2012 and 2011, the carrying value of our equity method investments was $4.9 billion and $4.7 billion, respectively, with our two largest equity method investments comprising approximately 92% of the balance.

We review our equity method investments for indicators of impairment on a periodic basis or if an event or circumstances change to indicate the carrying amount may be other-than-temporarily impaired. When such indicators are present, we then perform an in-depth review for impairment. An impairment assessment requires the exercise of judgment related to key assumptions such as forecasted revenue and profitability, forecasted tax rates, foreign currency exchange rate movements, terminal value assumptions, historical experience, our current knowledge from our commercial relationships, and available external information about future trends.

As of December 31, 2012 and 2011, we have not identified any instances where the carrying values of our equity method investments were not recoverable.

Fair value measures As required, Corning uses two kinds of inputs to determine the fair value of assets and liabilities: observable and unobservable. Observable inputs are based on market data or independent sources, while unobservable inputs are based on the Company's own market assumptions. Once inputs have been characterized, we prioritize the inputs used to measure fair value into one of three broad levels.

Characterization of fair value inputs is required for those accounting pronouncements that prescribe or permit fair value measurement. In addition, observable market data must be used when available and the highest-and-best-use measure should be applied to non-financial assets. Corning's major categories of financial assets and liabilities required to be measured at fair value are short-term and long-term investments, certain pension asset investments and derivatives. These categories use observable inputs only and are measured using a market approach based on quoted prices in markets considered active or in markets in which there are few transactions.

Derivative assets and liabilities may include interest rate swaps and forward exchange contracts that are measured using observable quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities. In arriving at the fair value of Corning's derivative assets and liabilities, we have considered the appropriate valuation and risk criteria, including such factors as credit risk of the relevant party to the transaction. Amounts related to credit risk are not material.

The Level 3 assets measured with unobservable inputs relate to certain pension asset investments and all long-lived assets fair valued on a nonrecurring basis related to the ion exchange process for the production of large cover glass, resulting in an impairment charge of $44 million. Refer to Note 16 (Fair Value Measurements) of the Consolidated Financial Statements for further detail.

Probability of litigation outcomes We are required to make judgments about future events that are inherently uncertain. In making determinations of likely outcomes of litigation matters, we consider the evaluation of legal counsel knowledgeable about each matter, case law, and other case-specific issues. See Part II - Item 3. Legal Proceedings for a discussion of the material litigation matters we face. The most significant matter involving judgment is the liability for asbestos litigation. There are a number of factors bearing upon our potential liability, including the inherent complexity of a Chapter 11 filing, our history of success in defending asbestos claims, our assessment of the strength of our corporate veil defenses, and our continuing dialogue with our insurance carriers and the claimants' representatives. The proposed asbestos resolution (Amended PCC Plan) is subject to a number of contingencies. The approval of the Amended PCC Plan by the Bankruptcy Court is not certain and faces objections by some parties. Any approval of the Amended PCC Plan by the Bankruptcy Court is subject to appeal.

For these and other reasons, Corning's liability for these asbestos matters may be subject to changes in subsequent quarters. The estimate of the cost of resolving the non-PCC asbestos claims may also be subject to change as developments occur. Management continues to believe that the likelihood of the uncertainties surrounding these proceedings causing a material adverse impact to Corning's financial statements is remote.

Other possible liabilities We are required to make judgments about future events that are inherently uncertain. In making determinations of likely outcomes of certain matters, including certain tax planning and environmental matters, these judgments require us to consider events and actions that are outside our control in determining whether probable or possible liabilities require accrual or disclosure. It is possible that actual results will differ from assumptions and require adjustments to accruals.

Pension and other postretirement employee benefits (OPEB) Pension and OPEB costs and obligations are dependent on assumptions used in calculating such amounts. These assumptions include discount rates, health care cost trend rates, benefits earned, interest cost, expected return on plan assets, mortality rates, and other factors. Actual results that differ from the assumptions are accumulated and amortized over future periods and, therefore, generally affect recognized expense and the recorded obligation in future periods. While management believes that the assumptions used are appropriate, differences in actual experience or changes in assumptions may affect Corning's employee pension and other postretirement obligations and future expense.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 34 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents As of December 31, 2012, the Projected Benefit Obligation (PBO) for U.S. pension plans was $3,198 million.

The following information illustrates the sensitivity to a change in certain assumptions for U.S. pension plans: Effect on 2013 Effect on Change in assumption pre-tax pension expense December 31, 2012 PBO 25 basis point decrease in discount rate + 6 million + 94 million 25 basis point increase in discount rate - 6 million - 91 million 25 basis point decrease in expected return on assets + 6 million 25 basis point increase in expected return on assets - 6 million The above sensitivities reflect the impact of changing one assumption at a time.

Note that economic factors and conditions often affect multiple assumptions simultaneously and the effects of changes in key assumptions are not necessarily linear. These changes in assumptions would have no effect on Corning's funding requirements.

In addition, at December 31, 2012, a 25 basis point decrease in the discount rate would decrease stockholders' equity by $122 million before tax, and a 25 basis point increase in the discount rate would increase stockholders' equity by $119 million. In addition, the impact of greater than a 25 basis point decrease in discount rate would not be proportional to the first 25 basis point decrease in the discount rate.

The following table illustrates the sensitivity to a change in the discount rate assumption related to Corning's U.S. OPEB plans: Effect on 2013 Effect on Change in assumption pre-tax OPEB expense December 31, 2012 APBO* 25 basis point decrease in discount rate + 2 million + 28 million 25 basis point increase in discount rate - 2 million - 28 million * Accumulated Postretirement Benefit Obligation (APBO).

The above sensitivities reflect the impact of changing one assumption at a time.

Note that economic factors and conditions often affect multiple assumptions simultaneously and the effects of changes in key assumptions are not necessarily linear.

Revenue recognition The Company recognizes revenue when it is realized or realizable and earned. In certain instances, revenue recognition is based on estimates of fair value of deliverables as well as estimates of product returns, allowances, discounts, and other factors. These estimates are supported by historical data. While management believes that the estimates used are appropriate, differences in actual experience or changes in estimates may affect Corning's future results.

Share-Based Compensation Share-based compensation cost is measured at the grant date based on the fair value of the award and is recognized as expense over the requisite service period. Determining the fair value of stock-based awards at the grant date requires judgment, including estimating expected dividends. In addition, judgment is also required in estimating the amount of share-based awards that are expected to be forfeited. If actual results differ significantly from these estimates, share-based compensation expense and our results of operations could be impacted.

New Accounting Standards Refer to Note 1 (Summary of Significant Accounting Policies) to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 35 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents Forward-Looking Statements The statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, in reports subsequently filed by Corning with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on Form 10-Q, Form 8-K, and related comments by management that are not historical facts or information and contain words such as "believes," "expects," "anticipates," "estimates," "forecasts," and similar expressions are forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that may cause the actual outcome to be materially different. Such risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to: • global business, financial, economic and political conditions; • tariffs and import duties; • currency fluctuations between the U.S. dollar and other currencies, primarily the Japanese yen, New Taiwan dollar, Euro, and Korean won; • product demand and industry capacity; • competitive products and pricing; • availability and costs of critical components and materials; • new product development and commercialization; • order activity and demand from major customers; • fluctuations in capital spending by customers; • possible disruption in commercial activities due to terrorist activity, cyber attack, armed conflict, political or financial instability, natural disasters, or major health concerns; • unanticipated disruption to equipment, facilities, or operations; • facility expansions and new plant start-up costs; • effect of regulatory and legal developments; • ability to pace capital spending to anticipated levels of customer demand; • credit rating and ability to obtain financing and capital on commercially reasonable terms; • adequacy and availability of insurance; • financial risk management; • acquisition and divestiture activities; • rate of technology change; • level of excess or obsolete inventory; • ability to enforce patents and protect intellectual property and trade secrets; • adverse litigation; • product and components performance issues; • retention of key personnel; • stock price fluctuations; • trends for the continued growth of the Company's businesses; • the ability of research and development projects to produce revenues in future periods; • a downturn in demand or decline in growth rates for LCD glass substrates; • customer ability, most notably in the Display Technologies segment, to maintain profitable operations and obtain financing to fund their ongoing operations and manufacturing expansions and pay their receivables when due; • loss of significant customers; • fluctuations in supply chain inventory levels; • equity company activities, principally at Dow Corning Corporation and Samsung Corning Precision Materials; • changes in tax laws and regulations; • changes in accounting rules and standards; • the potential impact of legislation, government regulations, and other government action and investigations; • temporary idling of capacity or delaying expansion; • the ability to implement productivity, consolidation and cost reduction efforts, and to realize anticipated benefits; • restructuring actions and charges; and • other risks detailed in Corning's SEC filings.

CORNING INCORPORATED - 2012 Form 10-K 36 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Back to Contents

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